Updating Your Car Radio: Is It Worth It?

Austin Butler

These days cars are a huge part of our lives, affecting where we can go, when we can go there, and how efficiently we can go there. While cars have also been a bit of a fashion statement the variety of cars available these days allows for more customization that draws in people of all types. The radio in your car is just one of those components, though it is good to take a long time to consider all your options if you’re looking to replace it.

The cost is the first thing that comes to mind when you need to update your radio. Radios come in all different shapes and sizes, as well as having different specializations such as a touch screen or an aux hookup. Because of the wide variety of these radios, the prices may vary, and you may not be able to find one that you like for cheap. Installation is also a big price, as you may have to pay for labor and parts if you chose to go to a mechanic, and if you do it the installation at home you run the risk of messing up and having to pay even more money. The dashboard of your vehicle may have to come out to replace the radio and if you don’t know what you’re doing this may cause major damage to your car or the wiring.

Whether or not you really need the radio is the other big factor. Sure, everyone wants the latest and greatest model of technology but unless there is some brand-new update or feature do you really need one? Ask yourself what having a new radio would provide for you and if it’s something that you need. But maybe you’re tired of listening to the radio, switching through stations as you try to avoid commercials, and thus spending your entire trip fiddling with the radio rather than relaxing.

All in all, getting a new radio is a big choice that comes in a small package. There are so many factors that come into replacing your radio that it is easy to see why some people don’t bother with replacing, instead turning to CDs and silence as they drive. Yet, some people still greatly want to be able to listen to their own music and so they turn to getting their own radio.

Whatever you decide it is important to go into the process knowing what you want and where to get it. Don’t let yourself get caught up on the small details until you get into the thick of the project; pick out your radio, decide if you’ll be doing the project on your own or by hiring a professional, and then put your plan into action. Once you’ve being that part of the project you can focus on the smaller details such as being out of a car for a few hours and planning your playlist for the first time you try out your new radio. 

Read more →

Upgrading Your Car Radio: The Hard Part

Austin Butler

Are you tired of seeing this radio in your vehicle everyday? I mean come on, most of our smartphones don't even have aux inputs! Get rid of the dongle and learn how to upgrade your radio.

We all dream of upgrading our car radio and installing the latest and greatest piece of equipment. With the growing popularity of downloaded music, Bluetooth, and the want to avoid commercials it’s no wonder that people want a radio in their car that will allow them to play their music. However, there are some downsides to getting a new radio.

Buying the right part

Before beginning your project, you want to make sure that you purchase the right parts. Each car is different in the dashboard area, so you’ll need to make sure that you purchase a radio that can be mounted properly. If you are unsure of the measurements of your dashboard you can take your vehicle to a shop or figure out the measurements yourself.

Once you have the correct measurements, you’ll need to find the right type of radio that will not only fit but also fits your needs. Try shopping around both online and in-store, making sure to compare and contrast what you like about each radio and what you dislike. After you settle on your radio you’re ready to begin. 

LUCKILY FOR YOU - We made it easy! 

Follow these steps on our website to find the correct part!

The Cost

While car radios might seem like the would-be cheap the truth is that they’re rather not. The piece of equipment that allows for either an aux hook up or Bluetooth, or both, can reach prices that rest in the high hundreds. This means that if you want something with high quality, you’re going to be paying a good amount of money for the radio alone. 

You can certainly buy a radio for a cheaper price if you so desire, but it may lack the features that you are looking for. Some radios come with just Bluetooth, while others make come with the option for both that and aux. There are also some radios that are touch screen or have a wide display, but those are the ones that run on the more expensive side so if you’re looking to save a few dollars try looking elsewhere. 

The Installation 

After you’ve purchased your radio then comes to the hard part: installation. If you’re handy with cars and their electrical workings you may be able to handle this project yourself. If you aren’t, however, you might want to consider taking your vehicle to a professional shop to see if they can help. Going to a professional can be costly, as not only have you paid for the radio but now you have to pay for the labor to install the radio, any parts that your vehicle might need to house the radio, and, depending on how long it will take, you may be out of a car for a hours at the least, a day or two at the most. 

Should you choose to tackle this task yourself you’ll need to make sure that you have the right tools for installation, as well as putting aside more time than you would if you took it to a shop. You’ll also need to make sure that you find a guide that has your specific model or else you run the risk of not having the right components. 

Read more →

The History of the Car Radio

Austin Butler1 comment

Could you imagine driving somewhere without listening to your favorite podcast of Spotify playlist? Or even worse, could you imagine without listening to anything besides the passenger in your vehicle?! Radios have become such a large part of our lives that it’s often hard to imagine a time without them. Unsurprisingly they have such a large and rich history.

By the 1920's, radios were taking over like a storm and people LOVED it! At the time radios were noisy, hard to tune and required some sort of technological knowledge. It wasn't long until people started implementing the radio into automobiles!

Some Early Attempts

Supposedly the first attempt at implementing a radio in a car was by Lee DeForest as a means of vehicle to vehicle communications at the 1904 World Exhibition in St. Louis. 

There were other early attempts like the one pictured below. Obviously to insert a radio in a car was extremely complicated and required an antenna to stretch over the top of the vehicle.

1922-1929

The beginning of the car radio is a bit foggy and controversial. There are many accounts of who made the first car radio, so we are going to go over the ones that claim they were the first!

It wasn't until 1922 that the first FACTORY car radio appeared in the Chevrolet 1922 model. Chevrolet offered a Westinghouse radio as a $200 option ($2,734 in 2016 dollars and almost half the price as the car itself!)

And the very first factory installed car radios also appeared when Chevrolet offered a Westinghouse radio for it's 1922 model year as a $200 option ($2,734 in 2016 dollars and almost half the price as the car itself!)

Another claim for the first radio installed in a vehicle was a man named George Frost, an 18-year-old enthusiast. Legend has it that he was the first person to attach a portable radio to his Ford Model T, though no one is able to verify or deny that claim. 

Even though radios had their popularity, it was rare for automobiles to have radios installed, most people didn't even own radios for their household! 

Also at the time, radios were extremely hard to tune! They required constant adjustment and had three knobs to be tuned to the exact radio frequency (which was AM radio). It wasn't until the invention of superheterodyne tuning that made everyones life easier when tuning a radio.

"A superheterodyne receiver, often shortened to superhet, is a type of radio receiver that uses frequency mixing to convert a received signal to a fixed intermediate frequency (IF) which can be more conveniently processed than the original carrier frequency. It was invented by US engineer Edwin Armstrong in 1918 during World War I.[1] Virtually all modern radio receivers use the superheterodyne principle."

By the late 1920s, superheterodyne tuning was becoming standard on home receivers. It reduced the tuning to a single knob and basically reinvented the radio!

"In 1926, Philco invented what could be considered the very first mass produced car radio, the Transitone and production began for the 1927 model year to be an option in Chevrolet sedans." 

In 1926, Philco invented what could be considered the very first mass produced car radio, the Transitone and production began for the 1927 model year to be an option in Chevrolet sedans.

1930-1950

Though it may have been Philco that was the first, it was The Galvin brothers that made the car radio an essential requirement. 

Galvin and his brother, Joseph, bought the bankrupt Stewart Battery Company at auction for $750.

The Stewart Battery Company also offered The Battery Eliminator, which allowed battery operated home radios to run on household current, the forerunner to today's wall-wart AC adapters. Which was also probably the likely cause of the Stewart Battery Company's bankruptcy as well.

In 1930 the first commercial car radio was introduced by a company known as Galvin Manufacturing Company, now known as Motorola; these radios were branded the Motorola 5T71 and rose in popularity, with sales reaching all the way across the border into Mexico. These radios were expensive for their time, the estimated cost being one hundred thirty dollars ($130), however, the price did little to reduce their popularity.

 A reproduction of the 1930 Motorola ST71. The world's first after-market car radio. The main chassis was bolted to the floor, the tuning and volume were made to fit on the side of the steering column and the speaker was either hung from the roof or placed haphazardly.on the floor. Sounds like my old car

Early model of a Motorola car radio! 

Another early Motorola car radio

Retail promotional display for the Motorola car radio, 1930s

Motorola made their last car radio in 1984.

AM Radio

"AM stands for “Amplitude Modulation”, as AM radio signals vary their amplitude to adapt to the sound information that is being broadcasted through the wavelengths. While changes in amplitude occur on FM radio as well, they are more noticeable in AM radio because they result in audible static. So, essentially, when you’re switching the channels on an AM radio, you’re hearing changes in amplitude, which is why distant broadcasts with weak signals will come across as very faint with the sound largely dominated by static."

FM Radio

"FM stands for “Frequency Modulation,” and, unlike AM radio, sound is transmitted through changes in frequency. While both FM and AM radio signals experience frequent changes in amplitude, they are far less noticeable on FM. During an FM broadcast, slight changes in amplitude go unnoticed because the audio signal is presented to the listener through changes in frequency, not amplitude. So, when you’re switching between stations, your FM antenna is alternating between different frequencies, and not amplitudes, which produces a much cleaner sound and allows for smoother transitions with little to no audible static."

1952-1965

In 1933 Edwin Howard Armstrong invented the FM car radio and they started the be offered in vehicles in the early 1950s. Despite this, however, most people kept the AM channels for the preference for the top 40 hits that were played.

The Gonset 3311 FM Automobile Radio Tuner was the first FM car radio converter. These converters mounted under the dash and used a tiny built-in AM transmitter tunable on a couple of pre-set frequencies to rebroadcast the FM signal to the car's AM radio. FM radio converters like this were available until the early 1980s. Image: Somerset

"And second, FM radio signals at the time were quiet and uncompressed. While AM signals remained fairly steady driving over hills and around buildings, FM in motion was subject to the "picket fencing" effect, the "fwip-fwip-fwip" sound an FM radio makes in motion.) Because of this, FM was thought as useless for cars by most mainstream radio manufacturers. But this didn't prevent upstart innovators from trying."

In 1979 the FM audience finally beat out the AM. In 1953 the search or seek function was added to car radios, making flipping through radio stations much easier!

High Fidelity 

Hi-Fi became extremely popular in the 1950s. But until 1956, it was only radios. You still couldn't play your own recorded music in your car.

High Fidelity became a national craze in the 1950s. And experimentation spilled over to automobiles. But until 1956, it was only radios. You still couldn't play your own recorded music in your car.

"The Highway Hi-Fi was an option for newer Chrysler cars from 1956 to 1960. They played special 7" records that played at 16 2/3 RPM, half the speed of a standard LP. The 16 RPM speed also became featured on many home record changers, allowing these records to be played in the car or at home."

The Highway Hi-Fi was an option for newer Chrysler cars from 1956 to 1960. They played special 7" records that played at 16 2/3 RPM, half the speed of a standard LP. The 16 RPM speed also became featured on many home record changers, allowing these records to be played in the car or at home.

"Chrysler dropped the 16 RPM Highway Hi-Fi in 1960 and quickly reinvented the Highway Hi-Fi in the early 1960s as an after-market system using RCA's 45 RPM records in a changer. While this allowed for broader selection as nearly all record companies made 45 RPM records, the record wear problem and skipping in the grooves from vehicle vibrations remained. And ultimately, RCA gave up on the system.


But auto manufacturers didn't give up on the concept of car audio. In fact, their attention merely shifted to endless-loop cartridge tape systems such as the 4 Track tape player."

4 Track and 8 Track Tape Players

The endless loop tape cartridge was invented in 1952. It had many potential uses, but radio stations adopted the endless loop cartridge before anyone.

"The endless loop tape cartridge was invented in 1952. It had many potential uses, but radio stations adopted the endless loop cartridge before anyone. Toledo businessman Earl Muntz saw a potential for car audio use in these broadcast tapes and went into business making 4-Track tape cartridges and players for car use in 1962, later adding home units as well." 

Roughly around the year 1985, the 8-track was introduced. These were developed by Learjet Corporation and allowed for people to play eight tracks in their vehicles, which also allowed for the tracks to be re-listening to again and again with the rewind function. 

1970-1980

"The 8-Track reigned car audio for most of the '70s. But cassette tape was starting to make inroads. By 1980, cassettes had overtaken 8-Tracks as the most popular car tape format."

The 8-Track reigned car audio for most of the '70s. But cassette tape was starting to make inroads. By 1980, cassettes had overtaken 8-Tracks as the most popular car tape format.

The company of Phillips introduced the cassette in 1964 though the popularity of the cassette wouldn’t gain the mass popularity that it is known for until the 1970s. With the introduction of the cassettes people were opened to the idea of mixtapes, which were mixes of music that people put together. Cassettes also allowed for musicians to reach their audiences better, with the recordings being sold in mass production.

1980-2011

In comes the 1980s and with it the introduction of the CD. With CDs now in the mix the car radio industry experienced a massive shift, needing to adapt to a disk that can be stuck on repeat as well as have the possibility to have a multi-disk rig on the radio. 

It was designed as a rich audiophile toy because nearly all of the very first CD titles were classical. The CDs themselves costed $30 each in 1984 (that's $70 in 2016 dollars.) Pop music also began appearing on CDs that year and so were the first in-dash CD player prototypes.

"It was designed as a rich audiophile toy because nearly all of the very first CD titles were classical. The CDs themselves costed $30 each in 1984 (that's $70 in 2016 dollars.) Pop music also began appearing on CDs that year and so were the first in-dash CD player prototypes."

But it would take until 1987 before the CD was on nearly the footing as cassettes and the then fading vinyl LP. Sony had invented the battery powered Discman in 1985 for playing CDs.

"But car CD players didn't become standard until the early 1990s. And soon, they would be upended by the MP3. But there were usually no adapter inputs for MP3 players. This led to the creation of tiny FM transmitters that relayed the audio from the headphone jack of an iPod or any other headphone jack equipped medium to the car's FM radio."

2011-Present 

TESLA MODEL S "INTERIOR II"

As with all things technology the CD was eventually rendered obsolete. Music and how we brought it into our lives were forever changed with the introduction of downloadable music. Car radios now need to have the function that allows you to hook up your wireless device, letting you play your own music over the car radio or else they are viewed as old and worn. Modern-day radios also have the ability to reach stations all across the world, rather than relying on the chance that there was a local station near you. 

"And going into the future, it looks very likely streaming and on-demand radio will eventually replace AM/FM, satellite radio and all physical formats. As cars themselves become more dependent on web based artificial control and access, this is the only next logical step in the evolution of car audio. Terrestrial radio is just one of a bazillion different other entertainment apps of daily life. And mobile technology is quietly developing as we speak.

While 5G isn't much more than a tech marketing buzzword now (the ITU has plans to have the 5G standards ready by 2020, in spite of the current tech market speculation.) And things will change further.

And as so will the model of car audio."

 

Sources: 

Read more →

Diesel and Gasoline: What's the difference?

Austin Butler

If you’re looking to get a new vehicle one of the first things that you should look at is the type of fuel that you want your vehicle to run on. Vehicles these days run on two types of fuel: either diesel or gasoline. You can find both types of fuel at any gas station that you go to, though some may have special pumps just for diesel while others may just lack a diesel hook-up altogether. It’s all dependent on the gas station. At a glance, these two might look similar but they are actually quite different.

The price difference between these two fuel types is also a big factor. While diesel fuel is often seen as being the more expensive, gasoline can also get up in price such as when gas prices are affected by international trade. 

Diesel

Though minute there are differences between diesel and gasoline fuel. Diesel fuel is what is called a slow burner fuel. It is called this because it has a much slower burn time than gasoline and requires a lot of oxygen to cause a reaction. Most, if not all, diesel engines will need a compression ratio of 20:1 to make the air hot enough so that it will ignite.  Any unburnt diesel fuel is pushed out of the engine, which causes the black smoke look that is often associated with diesel engines. 

Diesel fuel is also self-lubricating. This means that as the fuel burns it will lubricate the parts that it runs through, making it harder for them to stick together and cause fewer issues in the large tanks. This is vital for the types of vehicles that diesel engines are often found in, such as big trucks or heavy machinery. At roughly -20 to -30 degrees diesel fuel will coagulate and turn into a gel, whereas gasoline does not suffer from ‘freezing’. 

Jet fuel is a type of diesel, as it burns slow like diesel but it is safer as it does not explode.

Gasoline

Gasoline is more refined than diesel, being comprised of multiple carbon molecules that range in size. When combusted the gasoline is combined with clean air, which in turn make a vapor that is used to help ignite the gasoline and bring power to the vehicle. While this is happening the much large molecules are harder to burn, so it is estimated that only about 80% of fuel is burned the first time. Because of how the fuel burns this is the reason that gasoline engines are predominately found in vehicles that have small engines and need small horse-powers.

Unlike diesel, gasoline is not self-lubricating, which causes the metal parts to rub together. That is why you see people opt for using the higher grade, more expensive gasoline in their cars, especially if they are going on a long trip. This will minimize the wear on a vehicle while you travel. Gasoline will also evaporate quickly, while diesel will not. 

Frequently Asked Questions

Is Gas or Diesel Better For Towing?

Most truck enthusiasts will tell you the diesel is better than its gasoline counterpart when it comes to towing. The engines get better gas mileage, last longer and usually can tow more. Diesel Engines have a lot of low-end torque and can pull heavy loads up extreme grades with confidence.

Are Diesel Trucks More Reliable than Gas Engine Trucks?

Diesel engines “in general” are simply made to last longer because the engines require more robust parts to deal with the high-compression ratios and high cylinder pressure within the engine.

Which Trucks Have A Better Resale? Gas or Diesel.

In general, a diesel equipt truck will have a better resale. That said, you also have to take into account diesel trucks cost more starting out.

Read more →

How To Pack A Winter Car Emergency Kit

Austin Butler
Packing a winter emergency kit for your automobile is the single most important thing you can do for your car and for your personal safety. Having a box full of winter supplies in your trunk can make all the difference when something goes wrong while traveling on a cold winter day.

Read more →

How To Prepare Your Vehicle For Winter

Austin Butler
In some parts of the world extreme winter is a naturally reoccurring phenomenon that has an enormous effect on our daily lives.  It can snow or sleet or reach temperatures below freezing; this not only has an effect on the human body but on the vehicles that we drive. As you’re preparing, you're preparing yourself and your home for this upcoming winter don’t forget to prepare your car as well. It may help you save on money when it comes to repairs and any unfortunate experience that may occur.

Read more →

Buick Chevrolet GMC Mylink Intellilink 8" Radio Touchscreen Break Down and Repair [2015-2019]

Austin Butler

GM introduced the Mylink (Chevrolet) a.k.a Intellilink (GMC and Buick) infotainment systems to its brands in 2012. This new advanced system combines WiFi, Bluetooth and online app services that users can control through an optional 4.3" or 8" display. It also integrates with OnStar and other GM premium services.

In this article, we will show you how to disassemble and replace the touchscreen on your Mylink or Intellilink with 8 inch Touchscreen systems. GM uses two different touchscreen types depending on the screen assembly setup:

Type 1

https://www.factoryradioparts.com/products/2015-2016-2017-2018-2019-chevrolet-gmc-mylink-8-inch-capacitive-replacement-touch-screen

or

Type 2

https://www.factoryradioparts.com/products/2015-2016-2017-2018-chevrolet-gmc-delphi-mylink-radio-8-inch-resistive-replacement-touch-screen

We will focus on a screen assembly out of a GMC Sierra which has the Type 2 touchscreen mentioned above. 

When repairing a radio, we highly recommend that you keep all the screws safe in one area! We recommend a small cup or bowl.

Found in the following vehicle make/model(s):

  • (2014-2019) Chevrolet Silverado
  • (2014-2019) Chevrolet Tahoe
  • (2014-2019) Chevrolet Suburban
  • (2014-2019) GMC Yukon Denali XL
  • (2014-2019) GMC Sierra 1500 2500 3500

Tools

The tools you will need for this radio disassemble are:

  • Philips head screwdriver (drill preferred)
  • Razor blade
  • T8 Torex bit

    We recommend using a power drill, if available, to make the process faster.

     

    Step 1:

    To begin, start with the T8 Torx bit and remove these 12 gold screws. Once the screws are removed, gently remove the back of radio.

    Step 2:

    Next, remove these 3 ribbon cables.

    Step 3:

    Next, remove the circuit board followed by the LCD and touchscreen assembly. The LCD and touchscreen will come out as one piece.

    Step 4:

    Use a razor on all 4 sides to free the touchscreen from LCD. Gently remove the damaged touchscreen from LCD. 

    Remember to remove any excess black trim and ensure the LCD is clear of debris.

    Step 5:

    Remove screen protectors from new replacement touchscreen and place new touchscreen inside radio face plate. Use the cut out in the face plate to align the touchscreen.

    Step 6:

    Insert the LCD and touchscreen back into bracket.

    Step 7:

    Once LCD and touchscreen is inserted back into black housing, reinstall the circuit board and attach the 3 ribbon cables. 

    Step 8:

    Place the black plastic back on top of LCD and touchscreen. Lastly, reinstall the 12 gold screws and the repair is complete!

     

    Check out our products for all your factory radio parts needs.
    Email us at support@factoryradioparts.com  if you have any questions.
    We are happy to assist in anyway!

    Radio Repair Services

    If you don't want to repair your radio yourself, contact Factory Radio Repairs! They are fast, reliable, and provide expert support and diagnosis.

    CONTACT THEM TODAY FOR A FREE QUOTE! 

    Email: support@factoryradiorepairs.com



    If you have any questions, comment below or Call Us! Today! 1 855 572 3727

    Read more →

    Ford Lincoln MyFord Touch with 8 inch Touchscreen Sync 2 Breakdown and Repair [2011-2016]

    Austin Butler

     Ford released the MyFord Touch infotainment system in the 2011 Ford Edge. This new advanced system utilizes the Ford Sync functionality in combination with a refined 8 inch touchscreen interface and menus.There has since been several incremental software upgrades addressing some issues that have plagued the system since its introduction, such as touchscreen menu lag and voice recognition commands.[1] However, problems remained, and some owners continue to experience difficulties with the system, even with the new upgrade fully installed.

    In this article, we will show you how to disassemble and replace the touchscreen on your Ford Lincoln MyFord Touch with 8 inch Touchscreen Sync 2 navigation and non-navigation radio models. The Ford Lincoln MyFord Touch with 8 inch Touchscreen Sync 2 can be found in most of the vehicles listed below.

    When repairing a radio, we highly recommend that you keep all the screws safe in one area! We recommend a small cup or bowl.

    Found in the following vehicle make/model(s):

    • 2013-2016 Ford C-Max Hybrid & Energy
    • 2013-2016 Ford Escape
    • 2011-2016 Ford Edge
    • 2011-2016 Ford Explorer
    • 2015-2016 Ford Expedition
    • 2013-2016 Ford F-150 (including Raptor)
    • 2013-2016 Ford Superduty F-250 - F-550
    • 2013-2016 Ford Flex
    • 2012-2016 Ford Focus
    • 2013-2016 Ford Fusion
    • 2013-2016 Ford Taurus
    • 2015 Ford Mustang
    • 2013-2015 Lincoln MKS
    • 2015 Lincoln MKC
    • 2011-2015 Lincoln MKX
    • 2013-2015 Lincoln MKZ

    Tools

    The tools you will need for this radio disassemble are:

    • Philips head screwdriver (drill preferred)
    • Razor blade
    • T8 Torx bit
    • T20 Torx bit

      We recommend using a power drill, if available, to make the process faster.

       

      Step 1:

      To begin, start with the T20 Torx bit and remove these two brackets. Remove four black screws.

       

      Step 2:

      Next, switch to the T8 Torx bit and remove these four screws.

      Step 3:

      Next, gently pull open the touchscreen metal casing. 

      Step 4:

      Detach these two ribbon cables and take screen assembly out of bracket.

      Step 5:

      Use a razor on all 4 sides to remove touchscreen from LCD. Gently remove the damaged touchscreen from LCD. 

      Step 6:

      Remove any excess black trim and ensure the LCD is clear of debris.

      Step 7:

      Remove screen protectors from new replacement touchscreen and place new touchscreen inside radio face plate. Use the cut out in the face plate to align the touchscreen.

      Step 8:

      Once the new Factory Radio Parts touchscreen is inserted into the metal face plate, insert the LCD and touchscreen back into bracket.

      Step 9:

      After placing LCD into metal plate, place circuit board back on top of the LCD and reconnect the two ribbon cables.

      Step 10:

      Next screw back in the four screws that hold the LCD display in place and brackets and then you are done!

       

      Check out our products for all your factory radio parts needs.
      Email us at support@factoryradioparts.com  if you have any questions.
      We are happy to assist in anyway!

      Radio Repair Services

      If you don't want to repair your radio yourself, contact Factory Radio Repairs! They are fast, reliable, and provide expert support and diagnosis.

      CONTACT THEM TODAY FOR A FREE QUOTE! 

      Email: support@factoryradiorepairs.com



      If you have any questions, comment below or Call Us! Today! 1 855 572 3727

       

       

      References
      1.  "New Cars, Car Reviews, Car Prices and Auto Shows – MSN Autos"msn.com.

      Read more →

      Uconnect 3 8.4 inch RB5 RE2 Touchscreen Assembly Breakdown and Repair [2011-2019]

      Austin Butler

      In this article, we will show you how to disassemble and replace the touchscreen on the Uconnect 3 with 8.4-inch touchscreen navigation and non-navigation radio models. The Uconnect 3 with 8.4-inch touchscreen radio model variations are specifically used in the 2011-2019 the Chrysler, Dodge, Maserati, and Fiat vehicles listed below.


      When repairing a radio, we highly recommend that you keep all the screws safe in one area! We recommend a small cup or bowl.

      This video is ONLY for the following radio models: 2011-2019 Uconnect 3 with 8.4 inch Touchscreen RB5 and RE2 Radio Systems

      Found in the following vehicle make/model(s):

      • 2011-2014 Chrysler 300
      • 2013-2016 Dodge Dart
      • 2011-2019 Dodge Journey
      • 2011-2014 Dodge Charger
      • 2014-2017 Maserati Ghibli

      Tools

      The tools you will need for this radio disassemble are:

      • Philips head screwdriver (drill preferred)
      • Razor blade
      • Heat gun
      We recommend using a power drill, if available, to make the process faster.

      Step 1:

      To begin, start with the Phillips head and remove these 4 screws.

      Step 2:

      Next, remove the metal housing surrounding the touchscreen assembly by gently pulling apart.

      Step 3:

      Remove these 3 ribbon cables. 

      Step 4:

      Once the ribbon cables are detached, remove the metal bracket and attached printed circuit board. You should see the back side of the LCD display once removed.

      Step 5:

      Use a heat gun (if available) in the space between the touchscreen and LCD on all 4 sides to warm the adhesive glue.

      Step 6:

      Use a razor on all 4 sides to remove touchscreen from LCD. Gently remove the touch screen from LCD. 

      Step 7:

      Remove screen protectors from touchscreen and place new touch screen inside radio face plate. Use the cut out in the face plate to align the touchscreen.

       

      Step 8:

      Once the new touchscreen is inserted into the radio face plate, insert the LCD and touchscreen back into bracket.

      Step 9:

      After placing LCD into radio face plate, place circuit board back on top of the LCD and reconnect the 3 ribbon cables.

      Step 10:

      Next screw back in the four screws that hold the LCD display in place and you are done!



      Check out our products for all your factory radio needs.
      Email us at support@factoryradioparts.com  if you have any questions.
      We are happy to assist in anyway!

      Radio Repair Services

      If you don't want to repair your radio yourself, contact Factory Radio Repairs! They are fast, reliable, and provide expert support and diagnosis.

      CONTACT THEM TODAY FOR A FREE QUOTE! 

      Email: support@factoryradiorepairs.com



      If you have any questions, comment below or Call Us! 1 855 572 3727

      Read more →

      Porsche Taycan Is First Car With Apple CarPlay Built In

      Austin Butler
      On September 4th Porsche is releasing their fully electric sedan, the Porsche Taycan. Porsche continues to release additional details on its electric sedan with the latest news that the supercar will be the first car to have Apple Music functionality built directly into its infotainment system

      Read more →